Apex, NC Homes for Rent

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8417 Henderson Road Apex, NC 27539

$2,595 - 4Br/5Ba -  for Sale in Whippoorwill, Apex
New
Price $2,595
Bedrooms 4
Baths 4 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 3,951
Status Active
MLS # 2304375
Property Type Detached
 
 

2108 Frissell Avenue Apex, NC 27502

$2,195 - 4Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Crocketts Ridge, Apex
Price $2,195
Bedrooms 4
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 3,000
Status Active
MLS # 2303483
Property Type Detached
 
 

603 Old Mill Village Drive Apex, NC 27502

$1,750 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Old Mill Village, Apex
Price $1,750
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 2,066
Status Active
MLS # 2295278
Property Type Attached
 
 

1010 Purple Glory Drive Apex, NC 27502

$1,495 - 3Br/4Ba -  for Sale in Dogwood Ridge, Apex
Price $1,495
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 2 Half Baths
Square Feet 0
Status Active
MLS # 2300593
Property Type Attached
 
 

Located in southwestern Wake County, Apex combines a relaxing small-town atmosphere with convenience to big-city amenities. It is positioned for future growth and the town planners are working to ensure that the small-town character remains while allowing for many new residents to join our community.

In 2007, Apex was named the 14th Best Place to Live in the USA by Money Magazine. In 1994 Apex was named the state’s #1 Small Town in economic vitality by Business North Carolina magazine.

A major streetscape renovation project has restored Apex’s downtown and recaptured its historic flavor. The revitalized downtown is on the National Register of Historic Places as one of the best examples of an intact turn-of-the-century railroad town.

We invite you to join the hundreds of newcomers discovering our delightful small town ideally located in southwestern Wake County. Even though new residents relocate to Apex daily, we have maintained the small town character which is so unique in the rapidly-growing Research Triangle Area.

History

The Apex downtown reflects the town’s rich historical beginning. Apex was first settled around 1867 and was incorporated in 1873. The name “Apex” was adopted because the community was the highest point on the Chatham Railroad between Richmond, Virginia and Jacksonville, Florida.

apex1The Apex railroad station was first chartered in 1854 “for   the purpose of affecting a communication between the North Carolina Railroad Company (at Raleigh) and the coal fields of Chatham County.” Because of the war and problems with Reconstruction, the first locomotive did not pass through Apex until 1869. Since the Apex station was located in the heart of a vast pine forest, it became a shipping point for forest products such as tar, turpentine and lumber.
A community soon developed around the station. Stores and warehouses were built and many of the large forests in the area were converted to farmlands. Before long, Apex became an active trading and shopping center. When the disease known as the Granville Wilt ran many tobacco farmers out of Person and Granville counties at the turn of the century, these farmers found land around Apex to be equally suitable for tobacco production and settled here. The first Wake County tobacco auction market was established in Apex in 1905.

The Apex town motto, “Peak of Good Living” is appropriate for a number of historical reasons. Not only was the town named for being the highest point on the Chatham Railroad, but in places along the main street of Apex, water which falls on one side of the street flows to the Neuse River, and on the other side flows to the Cape Fear River.

 Attractions and Activities

Historic Downtown Apex
Salem Street North of Hwy 55

New Hope Valley Railwayapex4
5121 Daisy St
New Hill, NC 27562
(919) 362-5416

Parks and Recreation

Apex Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources sponsor a variety of special events each year.
• Easter Egg Hunt
• Old Fashioned 4th of July
• Turkey Trot 5k Run
• PeakFest

For details on upcoming events please visit: Upcoming Events.
Please visit Apex Parks for a complete list of community parks.

Carrboro, NC Homes for Rent

Cary, NC Homes for Rent

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1036 Upchurch Farm Lane Cary, NC 27519

$2,295 - 5Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Upchurch Farms, Cary
Price $2,295
Bedrooms 5
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 3,800
Status Active
MLS # 2291431
Property Type Detached
 
 

928 Bentbury Way Cary, NC 27518

$2,295 - 5Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Prestwyck, Cary
Price $2,295
Bedrooms 5
Baths 3
Square Feet 3,132
Status Active
MLS # 2299543
Property Type Detached
 
 

1146 Brookhill Way Cary, NC 27519

$1,900 - 4Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Arlington Park At Amberly, Cary
Price $1,900
Bedrooms 4
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 2,235
Status Active
MLS # 2298548
Property Type Detached
 
 

311 Euphoria Circle Cary, NC 27519

$1,895 - 4Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Harmony, Cary
Price $1,895
Bedrooms 4
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 2,576
Status Active
MLS # 2299547
Property Type Detached
 
 

111 Lelcester Court Cary, NC 27519

$1,895 - 2Br/2Ba -  for Sale in Carolina Preserve, Cary
Price $1,895
Bedrooms 2
Baths 2
Square Feet 0
Status Active
MLS # 2301958
Property Type Detached
 
 

108 Fairfax Lane Cary, NC 27513

$1,595 - 4Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Fairfax, Cary
Price $1,595
Bedrooms 4
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,757
Status Active
MLS # 2270455
Property Type Detached
 
 

510 Caprice Court Raleigh, NC 27606

$1,350 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Oak Run Townhomes, Raleigh
Price $1,350
Bedrooms 3
Baths 3
Square Feet 1,702
Status Active
MLS # 2272340
Property Type Attached
 
 

Welcome to Cary, North Carolina! Here in the heart of the Triangle area, nestled between Raleigh and the Research Triangle Park, we’re thriving! Ranked among the top regions in the country to live and work, start a business or retire, the place Money Magazine names as one of the hottest towns in America is just waiting for you to come join us. Tree lined streets and lovely subdivisions are only two of the reasons to enjoy Cary, whether you’re visiting or relocating here. We’ve got world class businesses and national retail stores as well as prestigious universities close by and while we’ve grown to over 100,000 people, we’ve maintained our small town charm.

Once you’re here, you’ll be calling your Realtor and making plans to relocate to our big ‘small’ city!  Learn more about Cary.

History

Cary began life as a settlement called Bradford’s Ordinary but credit is given to Frank Page for establishing Cary as a town when he and his wife Kate bought 300 acres surrounding the railroad junction in 1854. Page promptly named his development after Samuel Fenton Cary, a former Ohio congressman he admired) and became the railroad agent and the town’s developer. He laid out the first streets in Cary, building a sawmill, general store and post office, becoming Cary’s first official Postmaster.

By 1868, Page had built a hotel for railroad passengers and in 1871 Cary was incorporated, with Page becoming the first mayor. With the advent of the Raleigh and August Air-Line Railroad coming from the southwest in 1879, Cary’s growth continued. Although it grew quickly, in the early years Cary adopted ordinances to control growth and give the town structure and that tradition has continued.

In 1971 Cary’s government created a PUD (Planned Unit Development) to accommodate the growth created by the nearby Research Triangle Park. With the use of PUD’s, developers can plan out entire communities and ‘see’ the area before it actually exists, making it possible to use land to its best advantage. Thanks to their foresight, Cary is a beautifully maintained, well functioning city with over 100,000 people who live here and love their Cary!

Attractions & Activities

Page-Walker Arts & History Center

Built as a hotel in 1868 by founder Frank Page, by 1979, the hotel had been added to the list of National Historic Places. In 1985, residents of Cary banded together to save the building, restored it and today, it’s alive with classes, events, performances and exhibitions of local and regional artists. Come take a walk through the history of Cary and enjoy the many exhibits and artists that call the Page Walker Arts & History Center home.

 

artGallery Exhibitions

Talented local and regional artists display their work at various public venues in the parks and public venues. Located around town, gifted artists share their vision with the public, with an opening reception to meet the artists and attend the unveiling of exciting new work!

 

GolfteeMacGregor Downs Country Club

Play 18 holes, then hit the club house. Whether you’re a par golfer or a beginner, MacGregor Downs will keep you on your toes.

Parks & Recreation

With twenty four parks in Cary, there’s something for every member of the family, from playgrounds to tennis courts and walking trails.

northcarolinaparksAnnie L. Jones Park
Six lighted tennis courts, baseball, basketball and softball areas as well as a playground and picnic tables make for a great day of fun for the whole family!

Cary Dog Park
Bring Rover and let him run free on this one acre park, adjacent to Godbold Park, making new friends to fetch with while being safe.

Green Hope Elementary School Park
With a playground, picnic shelter and tables and three soccer fields as well as lighted volleyball courts, kids can play to their hearts content while you cheer them on!

Town of Cary Parks and Recreation lists all of the great parks in Cary.

Events

Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts FeCarySpringDazestival
Thirty three years has made this one of the South’s premier festivals, bringing 50,000 people into the downtown area of Cary for a fun filled day of food, arts and crafts and live entertainment. Don’t miss the fun!

Heart of the Holidays
Let an old fashioned Victorian Christmas bring you into the spirit of the holiday at the Page-Walker Annual Holiday Open House. Learn about century old traditions in the perfect setting, a newly renovated 1868 hotel. Sing Christmas carols around the piano, enjoy refreshments and take the tour to view historic rooms decorated for the season. It will be a fond memory that will last a lifetime.

Spring Daze Arts & Crafts Festival
Join in the festival that’s filled with your favorite festival food, arts and crafts and the opportunity to get involved in Cary to help improve a good thing. Kids will love the activities that are just for them, like The Children’s Village, and adults will love browsing arts and crafts of all the talented local artists.

To learn more about attractions and activities in Cary, visit Cary Recreation and Entertainment.

Homes for Rent in Chapel Hill, NC

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Chapel Hill, nicknamed the “Southern Part of Heaven” is a diverse population of over 48,000 people ranging from students to faculty to retirees. Although the town’s transformation from a small, rural village to an urban university city has been relatively recent, around 1940, Chapel Hill has managed to retain its southern elegance while becoming a cosmopolitan city, modernizing itself to fit quite well into the twenty first century.chapelhillcenterpiece

Once having an identity only as the home of the university, Chapel Hill has moved beyond that with a diversity that ranges from learning and a free exchange of ideas to maintaining a broad spectrum of athletic and cultural programs. It’s become a city where residents feel pride not just for what Chapel Hill was but for what it has become, embracing modern day life while retaining its love for its history and traditions.

History

Named after New Hope Chapel, Chapel Hill town lots were auctioned in 1793 when work began on the first university building, although it was still two years before residents began occupying the permanent homes. By 1871, H.B. Guthrie, Chief of Police was being called Mayor, even though officially he had been hired to keep the peace and preside over meetings of the board.chapelhillfranklinst

Linked forever with the town of Chapel Hill is its university. Created to serve the school, Chapel Hill has lived up to its duties and surpassed them, covering 820acres until its first modern annexation of Northside school and 275 acres, bringing the town’s size to almost 21 square miles.

Today, reminders of the history of Chapel are all around, cherished by residents and enjoyed by visitors. Quiet winding streets, homes on wooded lots and intimate shops add to the charm of the city.

Join us here and enjoy the natural elements that mere with the bustling metropolitan feel of Chapel Hill!

Attractions & Activities

AcklandArtMuseumAckland Art Museum

The Ackland Art Museum holds some of the most significant collection of art and work on paper in the Southeast.

 

performingartsCarolina Performing Arts

Nestled in the heart of the university’s historic campus, the Carolina Performing Arts has been host to world renowned performers through out its history.

 

carolinagourmetfoodtoursTaste Carolina Gourmet Food Tours

Native to Chapel Hill or not, you’ll love going behind the scenes to explore Southern dishes as well as house made chocolate to New York pastrami and organic wine and beer.

golfcourseview-200x150Finley Golf Club

Regardless of your skill level, there’s a tee for you! The 18 hole golf course designed by Tom Fazio in 1949, measures 6580 yards from the longest trees.
To view a complete listing of attractions and activities, please visit: Activities in Chapel Hill.

Parks & Recreation

Dedicated to providing every citizen the opportunity to enhance their quality of life, Chapel Hill parks and greenways provide space for families and friends to fellowship, play, walk, bike and relax. For more information, visit: Town of Chapel Hill Parks

Events Calendar

Annual Festifall Arts Festival
Come join our outdoor arts festival to celebrate Chapel Hill’s rich culture. Enjoy live entertainment with family and friends and enjoy dinner in some of downtown’s nationally acclaimed restaurants!

July 4th celebration and fireworks
The Fourth of July is ready to be celebrated in Chapel Hill! Bring the whole family and enjoy live entertainment, children’s activities and a spectacular fireworks display!

Homes for Rent in Clayton, NC

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128 Balboa Parkway Clayton, NC 27520

$1,495 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Parkview, Clayton
Price $1,495
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,510
Status Active
MLS # 2285488
Property Type Detached
 
 

64 Sundew Court Clayton, NC 27527

$1,495 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Magnolia Place, Clayton
Price $1,495
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,800
Status Active
MLS # 2301250
Property Type Detached
 
 

The community which has grown into the Town of Clayton was built on a road cut blazed by Governor Tryon’s troops around 1770 as they marched north from New Bern to Hillsborough against the Regulators. Nearly 100 years later the railroad came through and the community had its first name—Stallings’ Station, since the depot for the North Carolina Railroad was in the home of Mrs. Sarah Stallings. The name lasted only three years, however, before officially becoming Clayton. Incorporation followed in 1869.

The new town was far from prosperous, however the Civil War made a depressed local economy even worse. Many prominent citizens moved away during that period. But, following the war, the railroad was extended and businesses began to pop up. Ashley Horne developed a successful farming and merchandising business to become one of the most successful merchants and manufacturers in all of North Carolina. Horne’s success inspired two other men, McCullers and Barbour, to open businesses that also did well, beginning an era of growth that lasted well into the next century. Some of the businesses that flourished during that time were lumber plants, a brick kiln, cotton gin, gristmill, sawmill, tobacco warehouses, cotton mills and a turpentine distillery.

By the early 1900’s, the town had become a major market for cotton, watermelons and tobacco. In 1907, the Raleigh Evening Times of nearby Raleigh wrote that there was “more money per capita in Clayton than any city its size in the world”. Unfortunately, the town lost its financial eminence in the 1930’s with the onset of the Great Depression, and its population grew slowly for the next forty years. The three local cotton mills continued to be a major source of jobs during that time, with 1,000 employees, but the local economy was modest and cotton was soon on its way out. By the early 1960’s the mills were gone and cotton was no longer a player in the local economy. But, Tobacco was in, and the population shot up for awhile before settling back down as farming became less and less profitable.

The state began to change during the 1970s. An industrial base began taking shape and residential growth was increasing in the Raleigh area nearby. Clayton’s workforce adapted, shifting to a more service/trades-oriented economy and the town began to grow once again. By 1980, the population had increased from 4,091, to 4,756 by 1990 and, then jumped to 6,973 in the year 2000 census. Today, manufacturers like Caterpillar and bio-pharmaceutical companies like Talecris and Novo Nordisk are big local employers.

Commercial development along US 70 through town has changed the face of Clayton in recent years with thriving retail and service sectors. However, downtown Clayton still boasts quaint specialty and coffee shops, a thriving financial services area, furniture stores, restaurants, jewelry stores, and more than a dozen personal care businesses. Some of Clayton’s oldest businesses such as Beddingfield’s Drugs (1919), Jones’ Lunch (1958) and TR Lee Gas & Oil (1958) still operate downtown today. In recent years, a strong effort to protect and preserve the traditional downtown has helped the area maintain its economic vigor and historic charm.

Attractions and Activities

The Clayton Center
The Clayton Youth Theater
111 East Second St
Clayton, NC 27520

 

Hocutt-Ellington Memorial Library
100 S. Church Street
Clayton, NC 27520

 

 

The Clayton Community Center/Community Park
Amelia Church Road
Clayton, NC 27520

Parks and Recreation

Town of Clayton Parks and Recreation

 

 

Creedmoor, NC Homes for Rent

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7805 Coach House Lane Raleigh, NC 27615

$1,750 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Carriage Bluffs, Raleigh
Price $1,750
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,854
Status Active
MLS # 2299715
Property Type Attached
 
 

Homes for Rent in Durham, NC

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3 Lady Aster Court Durham, NC 27712

$1,950 - 5Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Country Club Heights, Durham
Price $1,950
Bedrooms 5
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 0
Status Active
MLS # 2302857
Property Type Detached
 
 

230 Cross Blossom Road Durham, NC 27703

$1,595 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Brightleaf, Durham
Price $1,595
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,600
Status Active
MLS # 2290805
Property Type Attached
 
 

450 Jerome Road Durham, NC 27713

$1,595 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Emorywood, Durham
New
Price $1,595
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,900
Status Active
MLS # 2303842
Property Type Detached
 
 

3352 Tarleton West Street Durham, NC 27713

$1,350 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Villages Of Cornwallis, Durham
Price $1,350
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,380
Status Active
MLS # 2287592
Property Type Attached
 
 

2627 Camellia Drive Durham, NC 27705

$1,200 - 2Br/2Ba -  for Sale in Crystal Pines, Durham
Price $1,200
Bedrooms 2
Baths 1 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,075
Status Active
MLS # 2301520
Property Type Attached
 
 

In 1854 Dr. Bartlett Durham sold a four acres of land to the North Carolina Railroad Company to build new station between Hillsborough and Raleigh and before long a small settlement grew there which was to become the city of Durham. The first tobacco factory had opened in Durham in 1854 by R. F. Morris. Ten years later, In 1865 the armies of Union and Confederate forces gathered around Durham Station as General Joseph E. Johnston negotiated his surrender to General William T. Sherman at Bennett Place at the end of the Civil War. Union troops liked the taste of the local bright leaf tobacco. This began the growth of Durham’s tobacco industry and led the city to prosperity. By 1880 Durham’s population had grown to over 2000. Textile mills began to grow along the railroad lines and banks and insurance companies soon appeared as money flowed into the community.

Tobacco companies owned by men like Washington Duke began to grow. Duke had begun his tobacco empire from a small log cabin on the Duke Homestead Residential neighborhoods grew around these industries as workers filled the town to work for tobacco where he was producing around 125,000 pounds of smoking tobacco annually. In April 1874, Duke purchased two acres near the railroad where he built a new factory marking the beginning of a large scale tobacco company which climbed rapidly to the top of the industry. Cigarette making had been by hand, a tedious job done by eastern European immigrants who could roll about 4 a minute. Duke took a chance on a new machine that had been developed in 1880 by eighteen year old James Bonsack that could make around 200 cigarettes an hour (when working properly). After some adjustments it was a success and Duke and his sons became major players in the world of tobacco. In 1890 they merged with their four largest competitors to form the American Tobacco Company and had a monopoly on tobacco products in the USA. When this trust was broken up by the US Supreme Court in 1911 four major companies emerged. They were Liggett and Myers, P. Lorillard, R. J. Reynolds and the American Tobacco Company.

durham2In 1892 Trinity College moved to Durham from Randolf County to land donated by Washington Duke and Julian Carr. Following a 40 million dollar donation by James Buchanan Duke, son of Washington Duke, the college was renamed Duke in 1924.
In 1898 John Merrick founded the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, the oldest and largest African-American owned life insurance company in America. M&F Bank, founded in 1907 was the strongest African-American owned bank in the US. Both were located in the neighborhood of Parrish Street which soon attracted more African-American owned businesses and was known throughout the country as “Black Wall Street.” In 1910 North Carolina Central University was founded by Dr. James E Shephard as the nations’ first publicly supported liberal arts college for African-Americans. Sit-ins were pioneered in Durham. During the civil rights era, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., made five public appearances in Durham. The most dramatic was on February 16, 1960 at the Durham Woolworth’s in 1960. The historic lunch counter is on display at North Carolina Central.

In 1910 the six story Trust Building on Main street was the tallest building in North Carolina. By the thirties a public works boom saw the construction of the Post Office, the Armory, Durham Athletic Park, the Snow Building and the CCB and Kress buildings as Durham products became known internationally and money flooded into the city. But as these companies grew and acquired more holdings many of them left the city and the center of Durham began to lose its vitality. By the seventies shopping malls and suburbs had drawn people away from downtown which was carved up by the Durham Freeway and the Downtown loop in a flawed attempt at ‘urban renewal’.

The 1980s some of Durham’s older neighborhoods began to be revitalized. Two old tobacco warehouses were restored creating the Brightleaf Square shopping center. The old Carolina Theatre was also restored durham4and became a center for live performances and films. The Historic Preservation Society of Durham was founded in 1974 to preserve Durham’s architectural heritage and people began buying old houses in various neighborhoods. In the years since many of the tobacco warehouses, factories and mills have been converted into shopping centers, condominiums, restaurants and offices. The Single A Durham Bulls baseball team, made famous by the film Bull Durham (actually they were one of the top drawing minor league teams before the movie ever came out) left their old park to a new $16-million brick ballpark in 1995 and the Bulls began playing in the Triple-A International League.

The loss of industry was certainly a big blow to the city of Durham, but the success of Duke University in academics and sports (particularly basketball), the growth of the Duke University Medical center and other hospitals and health services, not to mention nearby Research Triangle Park and North Carolina Central University is more than enough to off-set the losses and mistakes of the past. The downtown warehouses and lofts attract artists, dancers, musicians and restaurateurs and have made the city a good bet for investors. In the near future, if not right now, Durham should begin to look and feel like the exciting place it once was. With a vibrant international and artistic community, the people of Durham are ready.

Attractions and Activities


durham5American Tobacco Campus

318 Blackwell St Durham NC 27701
(919) 433-1566

Former “Lucky Strike” cigarette factory which was transformed into a 1 million sq. ft. retail, residential and office campus which includes restaurants, shops, amphitheatre and on-site parking garages.


durham6Brightleaf District

905 W Main St Durham NC 27701
(919) 682-9229

Shops, nationally acclaimed restaurants, and thriving nightclubs in the west end of Downtown Durham. Anchored by namesake Brightleaf Square; listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  It includes turn-of-the-century brick tobacco warehouses, art galleries, jewelers, clothiers, and specialty shops.

For more area attractions please visit: Things to do in Durham

Parks and Recreation

durham7Durham Parks and Recreation strives to help citizens discover, explore, and enjoy life through creative and challenging recreational choices that contribute to their physical, emotional, and social health. Let this site serve as your guide in planning healthy, fun, and quality activities for you and your family. Let us show you how to play more!

For more information, visit Durham Parks and Recreation.

Events Calendar

For a complete list of events in the Durham area please visit: Durham Events Calendar.

Fuquay-Varina, NC Homes for Rent

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1435 Sexton Ridge Drive Fuquay Varina, NC 27526

$1,495 - 3Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Sterling Ridge, Fuquay Varina
Price $1,495
Bedrooms 3
Baths 2 Full / 1 Half Bath
Square Feet 1,700
Status Active
MLS # 2303242
Property Type Detached
 
 

Frenchman William Fuquay first settled in the small farming town of Sippihaw, named for the original Native American tribe that inhabited the area. His great-grandson, a tobacco farmer named Stephen discovered a spring in the mid-1800s while plowing the fields of the family plantation. Originally used solely for drinking water, Stephen soon came to the conclusion that the mineral water flowing from the springs had healing properties. As word spread, locals began to help the springs establish this reputation, which brought residents from neighboring communities and counties to its waters. The springs were eventually walled in to better serve the tourists coming to the area by road or rail.

In 1860, Fuquay sold the springs to a group of local investors who formed the Chalybeate Springs Company to market the attraction and its waters. At that time another Sippihaw resident, J. D. “Squire” Ballentine, was returning home from the Civil War. Ballentine had been the town’s schoolmaster before going off to fight for the Confederate Army. During his tour of duty, he had received letters from one of many southern ladies who wrote to the troops to improve their morale. Originally signing her name “Varina,” Virginia Avery would later meet and fall in love with Ballentine. He continued to call her Varina throughout their life together. When he became the first postmaster at the new post office in town in 1880, he named it “Varina” in her honor. A community grew just south of the springs, near the post office and the couple’s Varina Mercantile Company general store. In time, it adopted the same name. Ballentine’s business success allowed him to construct the local historic landmark Ballentine Spence House in 1910, the first house to have plumbing and electricity in the area. This house still stands today.

The Fuquay Mineral Spring’s popularity grew toward the turn of the century, especially in the 1890s as local businessman John Mills developed the idea to offer “Moonlight Excursions” to the springs. He fitted flat rail cars with seats and offered nighttime train trips to southern Wake County from Raleigh. As more guests came to the springs to “take the waters,” a group of small hotels sprung up in town, along with restaurants, barbecue stands, and a dance pavilion with a player piano. The town became a tourist destination and was the site of special celebrations on Fourths of July and Easter Mondays. During these events, residents of Raleigh would take the train down to watch the accompanying baseball games and participate in the dances and celebrations. Hotels like the Ben Wiley Hotel catered to the out-of-towners and became as much a center of town life as the springs. In 1902, Sippihaw was renamed “Fuquay Springs” in honor of its founding family and was officially incorporated in 1909.

When it was incorporated, the new Fuquay Springs town limits included the Varina business district and the rail junction of the Cape Fear, Northern, Norfolk, and Southern Railroads, the core of the neighboring town. But Varina reestablished itself the following year when the Varina Union Station was erected and a new post office was created, spurred by the lobbying of Ballentine. Four years later, the Bank of Varina was established, competing directly with the Bank of Fuquay (now Fidelity Bank). Several warehouses for the growing tobacco business were built in town over the next few years, capitalizing on the railroad connections. Another supply store and a knitting factory followed.  As Varina came into its own as a hub for area agriculture, the Fuquay Springs Corporation was formed and began bottling and selling mineral water from the springs commercially. Area businesses continued to develop and in 1927, US 401 was paved through town, shortening travel times to Raleigh and nearby communities, the Fuquay Springs Corporation was formed and began bottling and selling mineral water from the springs commercially. Area businesses continued to develop and in 1927, US 401 was paved through town, shortening travel times to Raleigh and nearby communities. The shared emphasis on agricultural and industrial growth brought the towns to a shared vision, and as their residents worked, played, and attended church together, the eventual merger into Fuquay-Varina in 1963 was inevitable.

Attractions and Activities

The Taste of Fuquay-Varina continues to draw crowds from all over Southern Wake County as we judge our areas’ finest cooks! Our contests include “Best Tasting Cakes”, “Best Decorated Cakes” and our area restaurants will have round two of the “Best Chicken Wings in Southern Wake.”

Other festivals and activities that Fuquay-Varina has to offer are as follows:  Celebrate Fuquay-Varina with the Celebration of the Arts, The downtown Farmer’s Market, Chili Cook-Off, Independence Day Celebration with fireworks, Trick or Treat and Easter Candy Hop in historic downtown, Holiday Open House, Christmas Tree lighting with free sleigh rides and the Fuquay-Varina Downtown Cruise In festival.

The Fuquay-Varina Calendar of Events will show you all the happenings in FV.

Parks and Recreation

The Fuquay-Varina Parks and Recreation Department is now responsible for thirteen park sites with seventeen athletic fields, one gym, and a Community Center offering programs for fitness, education, and recreation. It sponsors adult athletic leagues and coordinate efforts with the Fuquay-Varina Athletic Association (FVAA) to provide outstanding youth sports programs.

Homes for Rent in Garner, NC

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57 Callisto Way Garner, NC 27529

$1,700 - 4Br/3Ba -  for Sale in Jordan Ridge, Garner
Price $1,700
Bedrooms 4
Baths 3
Square Feet 2,363
Status Active
MLS # 2289326
Property Type Detached
 
 

Garner got its start with the coming of the railroad through the area beginning in 1847. In that year, after a tie-breaker vote by the Speaker of the State House of Representatives, what is now Garner was chosen as the location of a station of the North Carolina Railroad between Goldsboro and Charlotte. “Garner’s Station” was established with the construction of a post office in 1878 and the Town of Garner’s Station incorporated in 1883.

There are several legends as to how Garner got its name. One story has it that Thomas Bingham named the town. Bingham is said to have combined a general store with handling the mail. Since Webster’s defines “garner” as a “granary,” hence figuratively, a “store,” he named the town “Garner.”

The late Parker Rand believed that Garner was named for a family that lived in the area and later moved to Texas. Others believe the town was named by Henry Fort, a black cabinetmaker and carpenter who owned some land along the railroad after the Civil War. William S. Powell stated that Garner was named for its founder, H.C. Garner. An article in The State also named H.C. Garner as its founder, but not much information has been found about the man.

Farming was the chief source of income for the early settlers of Garner and nearby areas, with cotton the principal crop. Before the turn of the century, some small businesses were beginning to be developed. The first business in Garner is said to have been a wood shop owned by Henry Fort. Fort was said to have been a fine cabinetmaker and carpenter, making wardrobes, bureaus, and other pieces of wood furniture still being used by some Garner residents today. One of the first grocery stores in town was owned by Thomas Bennett. Other early businesses included a mercantile business owned by H.D. Rand, a drug store operated by George Montague, and several general stores operated by people such as C.H. Dupree, Jr., R. Garner, J.B. Hobby, and J.R. Williams. In addition to general stores and cotton gins in the area, other businesses such as blacksmith, repair shops, barber shops, livery stables, and boarding houses existed. The first bank was established in Garner in 1910. H.D. Rand was president and J.A. Weathers was the cashier. In 1912, telephone service came to Garner. In a short while, there were as many as 10 subscribers. The first switchboard was operated in the home of Vera Jones. The telephone service closed after two years and then returned in 1924. The business and residential life of Garner continued to grow steadily throughout the years, with more rapid growth in recent times.

With the increased population and residential growth, Garner has burgeoned in business and service establishments, both within the corporation limits and the extraterritorial jurisdiction of the town. Town officials predict the town will continue to grow at a rapid rate.

 

Attractions and Activities


Garner Performing Arts Center

742 W. Garner Road
Garner, NC  27529
(919)-661-4602
The Towne Players Theater Group
(919)-779-6144

 

Polar Ice House of Garner
103 New Rand Rd
Garner, NC 27529
(919) 861-7465

Homes for Rent in Hillsborough, NC

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